CREPUSCULE

I will wade out

till my thighs are steeped in burn-

ing flowers

I will take the sun in my mouth

and leap into the ripe air

Alive

with closed eyes

to dash against darkness

in the sleeping curves of my

body

Shall enter fingers of smooth mastery

with chasteness of sea-girls

Will I complete the mystery

of my flesh

I will rise

After a thousand years

lipping

flowers

And set my teeth in the silver of the moon

 

e e cumming, 1917

Juana Olga Barrios | Domus, 2018

MAD MUST WATCH | REVERSING ROE

We are already fucked. The patriarchy is clawing back women’s rights, freedoms, dignity. Helloooooo, Margaret Attwood!

LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA

Who is Sara Menker?

Disguised

Yotam Ottolenghi in Conversation with Lin-Manuel Miranda + Vanessa Nadal

The Best Cookbooks of Fall 2018

photograph | Todd Webb, 1958

! ♥ ! ♥ ! ♥ !

ON FEMALE RAGE

Excellent piece on anger and what happens when you don’t own it.

For years, I described myself as someone who wasn’t prone to anger. “I don’t get angry,” I said. “I get sad.” I believed this inclination was mainly about my personality — that sadness was a more natural emotion for me than anger, that I was somehow built this way. It’s easy to misunderstand the self as private, when it’s rarely private at all: It’s always a public artifact, never fixed, perpetually sculpted by social forces. In truth, I was proud to describe myself in terms of sadness rather than anger. Why? Sadness seemed more refined and also more selfless — as if you were holding the pain inside yourself, rather than making someone else deal with its blunt-force trauma.

But a few years ago, I started to get a knot in my gut at the canned cadences of my own refrain: I don’t get angry. I get sad. At the shrillest moments of our own self-declarations —I am X, I am not Y — we often hear in that tinny register another truth, lurking expectantly, and begin to realize there are things about ourselves we don’t yet know. By which I mean that at a certain point, I started to suspect I was angrier than I thought.

ENCOURAGEMENT

Because we all need a little encouragement.

ROSE WYLIE

SUNDAYS IN NEW YORK

VENI VIDI VICI

In a season of extraordinary theatre, it is impossible for me to pick my top performance, but last night’s Network, with Bryan Cranston in the lead, Tatiana Maslany making her Broadway debut, and Ivo Van Hove directing was pure, relevant, thought-provoking entertainment at its best. Extraordinary season. Feeling so lucky to have seen so much talent and to have walked away with even more to consider. ♥

WHO IS ANAND GIRIDHARADAS?

Just got my hands on his new book, Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World and looking forward to spending time with this incredible, provocative mind,

RICHARD PRINCE | HIGH TIMES

I’m a fan of Richard Prince’s work, especially his evocative appropriations of de Kooning + Picasso, and his Instagram New Portraits, which have led to yet another round of lawsuits with which the artist is constantly embroiled. His current show at Gagosian Chelsea is overpowering in its scale and vibrancy but somehow failed to move or interest me. Roberta Smith, however, disagrees. Worth a visit anyway, especially with kids.

MY BRILLIANT FRIEND

I am swooning . . . .

An interview is a collaboration, too, though like all collaborations with Ferrante, an imbalanced one. Often she answered my questions in the same oblique style as her narrator. “Maybe in more than a few cases I was overly frank,” she wrote when I asked her what instructions she gave Costanzo. “Maybe I intervened, with some presumptuousness, in irrelevant details.” She told me she thinks collaborations between women are more difficult than collaborations between a woman and a man, whose authority a woman can either submit to or pretend to recognize while pursuing her own agenda. “Certainly it’s more complicated to recognize the authority of another woman; tradition in that case is more fragile,” she wrote. “It works if, in a relationship between the person in charge and the subordinate, the first wants the other to grow and free herself from her subordinate status, and the second gains her autonomy without feeling obliged to diminish the other.”

~NYT